Commodore 64 Repair & Test

My partners beloved Commodore 64 switched on and managed to load games via a multicart but I couldn’t get any sound output.

After a short Internet search, I found many articles suggesting the SID chip would probably be faulty. This chip is the sound synthesizer for the C64. The diagnostic cart test showed some errors and when it got to the sound test, again there was no sound output.

img_3461.jpg

img_3454.jpg

The case opens after removing three screws along the bottom of the case.

IMG_3458

This is the faulty SID chip on the motherboard.

IMG_3457IMG_3456IMG_3455IMG_3781

IMG_3776

This is the new 6581 SID chip that I ordered from Etsy for just under £38.

IMG_3779

IMG_3777

IMG_3778IMG_3460

The diagnostic cart still shows errors but the sound now works.

IMG_3782

This is the multicart with a selection of games to play.

Looking at the list of games on the multicart:

Playing Astroblitz from the multicart:

 

 

iPhone, Android Charging Keyring

Bought this little gadget from Robert Dyas at the weekend for £3.43. Such a simple device but really useful. It can be used as a charge cable for android and iPhone’s in one cable. It attaches to a keyring and is so small you can forget about it being there. The USB end and the charger end connect together with a little magnetic clasp. The cable is short but that’s why its so unobtrusive when connected to your keyring.

I’m always running out of phone charge at work and don’t have a charging cable. This means I will always have a charge cable with me.

Image result for keyring usb apple android magnet

Gakken World Eye & Raspberry Pi

Gakken WorldEye connected to a Raspberry Pi running a program to display a huge blinking eye.
Adafruit provide a nice tutorial on connecting the Gakken to a raspberry pi running their eyes script.
I took a brand new Raspberry Pi 3 and went here  to download the latest copy of Raspbian Stretch Lite operating system.
I then flashed the image onto a new 64GB Micro SD card
 using etcher.io.
This version of Raspbian is command line only so once the initial boot up takes place, you need to configure the wireless network access:
Once the file opens, you need to edit the contents to match the screenprint below:
Press CTRL-X and then Y to save and and exit. Then run the following command to have the file read and try to connect to your Wifi.
Now we have Internet access we can download the software to make the eye work:
At the command prompt, type the following:
  1. cd
  2. curl https://raw.githubusercontent.com/adafruit/Raspberry-Pi-Installer-Scripts/master/pi-eyes.sh >pi-eyes.sh
  3. sudo bash pieyes.sh

Finally, connect the Raspberry Pi HDMI output to the input on the Gakken Worldeye and run the setup. This took about 10 minutes to complete.

IMG_3746IMG_3747IMG_3748IMG_3749IMG_3750IMG_3751